Packaging for New Products

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Packaging for New Products

As the world evolves, new industries will mean new challenges. One, of course, is how to design a new way of packaging for new products. Novelties always cause friction and uncertainty, but they’re also the perfect field for innovation: where to test in, better than the unexplored?

In a recent interview with Packaging World, Marjorie Fischer, (Brand Manager at Auntie Dolores), talked about the challenges and the process of designing packagings in an industry as new as that of medical marijuana:

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“It’s not just about branding, appearance, and functionality. In the cannabis industry, we have to think about legality on a state-by-state basis.”

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Some days ago we already talked about packaging requirements, but this is another whole level. Standards and approved formalities take some time to spread across borders, but new products jump over them much faster. Different states, (or countries), mean various legal frames, and different structures mean different labels; which, in turn, mean different packages.

Whenever jumping into a new industry, have in mind that your reference guide will grow exponentially, and that might mean severe creative limitations. But that doesn’t mean that you should come to a standstill irredeemably — quite the opposite, in fact. New industries are in deep need of creative packaging designers.

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“As we look forward we realize that (…) our packaging needs to be about more than just following the regulations. It needs to be about attracting customers.”

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New industries need customers more than anyone else. If they don’t get them early or aren’t able to sustainably do so, collapse is certain. Designing new forms of packaging for new products is one of the most demanding fields, because attraction might be the only reason for purchase. When a product isn’t well known, the public becomes cautious. And cautiousness doesn’t sell.

When designing those new packages, the designer’s first job should be that of appeasing the customer: of presenting the new product related to something understandable and familiar. Only then can he concern himself with the features of the product itself. New things will always be first perceived as new, no matter how good.

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Source, (photos):

Main: http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/quirky_community.php